Reflecting on ASB

Candice Yono

Candice Yono: ASB in Washington

Candice Yono (MSI ’14) participated in ASB during her first year at UMSI in 2013. She volunteered at the Office of Art and Archives at the U.S. House of Representatives, and was mentored by UMSI alumna Alison Trulock (MSI ’09).

The memory that stands out most from her ASB trip was a visit to the National Archives. Her mentor made an appointment with an archivist to view some of the gems of the National Archives, which included original drafts of the Bill of the Rights.

“It was an incredible moment to see an original Bill of Rights document, complete with notes in the margins,” Candice says. She was the top individual fundraiser for ASB in 2013, raising over $2,000 for the program on the social networking site crowdrise.com.

Candice notes that working with Trulock was particularly rewarding. “She was an incredibly helpful mentor,” Candice says. “Talking about her experiences at SI connected me to her work.”

Nicholas Chin

Nicholas Chin: ASB in Detrot

Nicholas Chin is a junior earning a Bachelor of Science in Information at UMSI. He will be participating in ASB 2015 for the first time at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit. This annual conference (June 18-21) is described as a collective laboratory of artist-activists using media to incite change and effect social justice: from break dancers to video bloggers to filmmakers to radio producers.

Nick’s work involves making the data from the past 17 years worth of conferences more accessible to the public. Specifically, he will take Excel data and translate it to an online web tool. He hopes his work will generate “meaningful interaction,” making the information that results from the conference available to a wider audience.

The goal of his Collective Memory Mapping with Data project is to translate the data into visual stories about “how one thing leads to another.” The project will track how conference participants’ involvement increased (or decreased) over time, how ideas presented in workshops evolved from year to year, and what the unexpected outcomes of the conference were.

Nick is looking forward to his project and sees his role as one of “data storytelling — how numbers form a story, a cohesive narrative.” He says, regarding ASB, that it challenges him to ask: “What can I apply into the real world?” Nick imagines the program will push him to think about the information career path he will take following the real-life learning that will come from his ASB experience.

Megan Morrissey

Megan Morrissey: ASB in Washington

Megan Morrissey is participating in ASB for the second time. The second-year master’s student spent ASB 2014 working on a digitization project at Georgetown Law School in Washington, D.C., where she was responsible for digitizing a collection of historic legal documents.

The experience, in Megan’s words, “made me happy I chose U-M.” What she liked about her role was the responsibility it gave her. With such a large project to oversee, and only a week in which to do it, she needed to organize her work into steps. “You can’t do everything,” she says. “You see what materials you have and you make a plan.”

This year, Megan will continue her work on historical projects as she digitizes a collection of albumen prints for a theological school in Chicago established in 1844. The impact of this project, in Megan’s view, is that more people researching the school and its notable alums will have better access. She will be working with 19th century photos of the school’s graduating classes, what are known today as “class photos.”

Megan is excited about managing the project from start to finish. She will be scanning and rehousing photographs and uploading them to a content management system. What’s special about this role is that she will have access to a mix of digital and analog preservation. Megan says that exposure to both sides of preservation is unique, and she feels fortunate to be able to work on the project this way.

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